NEET: Delhi High Court upholds amendments for studying medicine abroad

NEET: Delhi High Court upholds amendments for studying medicine abroad

The order came on batch of petitions challenging the amendments to the Foreign Medical Institution Regulations, 2002, and Screening Test Regulations, 2002, made by the MCI. The petitioners had complained that the new requirements were arbitrary.
New Delhi October 3, 2018

The Delhi High Court has upheld the Medical Council of India’s (MCI) amended regulation mandating those wanting to study medicine in a foreign university to clear NEET. In a relief to those who want to study medicine abroad but could not pass NEET, a bench of Justices S Ravindra Bhat and A K Chawla directed the MCI to grant eligibility certificates to such candidates for this year. From next year, however, students will have to pass NEET to study abroad, as required by the amended screening test regulations.

“This court is of the opinion that the MCI’s amended regulations, mandating that those desirous of studying abroad, had to appear and qualify in NEET has direct nexus with the quality of professionals who — or many of who would — wish to practice the medical profession and seek enrolment in the State register, for that purpose. It is now essential that everyone wishing to secure admission to any medical college in India has to appear and clear the NEET… Such a requirement is neither unreasonable nor arbitrary,” the bench observed.

The order came on batch of petitions challenging the amendments to the Foreign Medical Institution Regulations, 2002, and Screening Test Regulations, 2002, made by the MCI. The petitioners had complained that the new requirements were arbitrary.

MCI counsel T Singh dev submitted that the system of NEET regulates entry of candidates into the field of medical education so that only suitable candidates with competence and capability obtain admission to educational institutions at the undergraduate level. He argued that many candidates who obtain admission in foreign institutes find it very arduous to even complete the primary medical course and are unable to qualify the screening test for obtaining registration to practice medicine in the country.

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